SAMI Invites Students to “Organize Together”

Wednesday September 10th, 2014

The prison-abolitionist student group Students Against Mass Incarceration (otherwise known as SAMI), published a letter encouraging new and current students to “join us as we build communities that resist the norms upheld by Columbia’s white supremacist history and culture”. The letter, included in their weekly Blast, also encourages students to both reflect on the historical significance of this past summer (regarding the anniversary of the 1964 Freedom Summer Project, and the heightened awareness around the violent reality of police violence against Black and Brown communities), as to support the Columbia Prison Divest campaign. 

The Blast also promoted their first event of the year, hosted by Lucha and Columbia Prison Divest, which is scheduled for tonight at 7pm in the Malcolm X Lounge. The event, titled “Black, Brown or otherwise Deviant”, will explore the criminalization and incarceration of marginalized communities in the United States. 

You can read the letter, and find a copy of their Blast after the jump. You can also reach out to SAMI via email (sami.columbia@gmail.com) or social media to sign up for their weekly Blast. Be sure follow TALK for more coverage on SAMI, the Prison Divest Campaign, and other student organizing activities throughout the year. 


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Coalition Against Gentrification-Columbia Prison Divest Joint Statement on Columbia’s Response to Raid in West Harlem

On June 5th, Columbia students received an email from Vice President for Public Safety James F. McShane, informing us of the arrest and indictment of 100 “suspected gang members” in West Harlem in “one of the largest gang arrests in New York City history”. McShane argued that these mass arrests, which involved years of surveillance and militarized police tactics including helicopter patrolling, are parts of the process to “make our city and community safer”. Further, McShane stated that “Following these arrests, we are actively supporting an enhanced police presence in West Harlem and increasing our public safety personnel and patrols in and around Columbia buildings in Manhattanville. We will continue to do everything possible to keep making our campus community even safer.”  On behalf of Coalition Against Gentrification (CAGe) and Columbia Prison Divest (CPD), we want to express our deep disagreement with the forms in which McShane, and by extension, Columbia, are responding to the raid and the idea of “safety” that they are promoting.

Firstly, we object to the tone in which McShane wrote to the Columbia community regarding what is fundamentally a tragic and violent series of events in the housing units closest to Columbia University. The violence that has taken place in the past years in Manhattanville and Grant Houses has taken a deep toll on a community which Columbia University, despite being only a few blocks away, does not know or understand, making it highly inappropriate for Columbia to judge what safety for these communities means.  Not only this but it is clear that the university is not actually concerned with the safety of community members, as McShane goes on to emphasize his commitment to “keep making our campus community even safer.”

Even more disturbing is the idea that this arrest makes Columbia students “safer”, for two reasons:
Firstly, it creates an idea that the main source of insecurity at Columbia comes from the “outside”, an outside depicted in racialized terms that reinforce the projection of danger on poor communities of color. In fact, the majority of acts of victimization of Columbia students come from within Columbia’s gates, as evidenced by the statistics around sexual violence, and the violence that the administration itself enacts by failing to take this violence seriously.
Secondly, it creates a zero-sum idea of community, in which Columbia students are safe at the expense of the community around us. We believe that the application of militarized and systemic violence on the West Harlem community does not make Columbia students safer, and that the rhetoric that says it does instrumentalizes the concept of “our campus community’s safety” and underlying racist fear to justify violence imposed on others.  

Underlying this mutually exclusive rhetoric around Columbia students’ safety is the very logic behind gentrification, to which we profoundly object. This logic is based on the premise that the well-being of a neighborhood is incompatible with the people who originally live there, particularly poor people of color. For that reason, the “cleaning-up” of a neighborhood, in which “safety” is a central component, consists of criminalizing the original inhabitants and dispossessing them of their housing, jobs and rights.

Hence, the people of West Harlem are being dispossessed over and over. Under Columbia’s expansion, the University began to buy up apartment buildings in the area, displacing the first wave of residents before the speculative frenzy to follow. Since 2004, real wages have fallen, domestic rents have risen, and ground rents for local businesses have grown dramatically in expectation of a new influx of more expensive stores.  As thousands are being displaced, and stores are succumbing to rents that appropriate up to 95% of monthly revenues, many more local youths find themselves out of work (unemployment amongst people of color below 30 in Manhattanville is hovering around 70%).  This has culminated in an extremely difficult situation for young people. For the last decade leaders in West Harlem from Grant Houses, Manhattanville Houses, Coalition to Preserve Community, and The Mirabal Sisters have advocated for policy reforms to improve these conditions.

Rather than address the structural problems that it has a part in creating, Columbia’s response has been to support the increased police militarization of the area, delineated in McShane’s letter, a police presence that has proven to be racist and to deepen the inequalities of race and class in the neighborhood and city.

As students, we object to the use of a dishonest representation of “our safety” as a tool to perpetuate violence on West Harlem residents. We do not feel safer when our university is inflicting violence on the community around us. Instead, we call on Columbia to cease justifying its violence and expansion with our safety. If Columbia is serious about decreasing violence then it must stop supporting and contributing to increased policing, cease its own violent practice of expansion and attend in meaningful ways to the real causes of violence within the Columbia community.  We demand that Columbia fulfill the promises it has made in its community plan and organize its relationship to the West Harlem community around principles of support for the community’s health, independence, and well-being instead of favoring actions that increase violence and poverty.

-Coalition Against Gentrification and Columbia Prison Divest

For further reading on the raid and Columbia’s expansion:
http://jjie.org/harlem-residents-we-asked-city-for-help-we-got-a-raid-instead/107031/
http://www.columbia.edu/cu/cssn/expansion/

Misgendering is violence. Misgendering perpetuates violence. It is a deliberate act to cause harm, pain, and suffering. Intentionally misgendering someone is what people do when they cannot enact violence upon a person psychically. They resort to words and phrases they know cause anguish and turmoil. That is the very core of intentional violence, to cause harm. Intentional misgendering is nothing less than violence.

- source (via the-last-homely-url)

(Source: thelasthomelyurl, via tracey-wang)

TALK at Brooklyn Zine Fest!

Tomorrow TALK  will be tabling at the Brooklyn Zine Fest hosted by the Brooklyn Historical Society from 11am-6pm!

"The Brooklyn Zine Fest is a yearly exposition of self-published magazines in the greatest borough in the greatest city in the world.  Expanding to two days, BZF 2014 will be held on Saturday, April 26th and Sunday, April 27th, 2014 (from 11am to 6pm both days) at Brooklyn Historical Society at 128 Pierrepont Street (corner of Clinton St.) in Brooklyn Heights.  This third annual event will showcase approximately 150 writers, artists, and publishers from New York City and beyond over two days.”

FB event for Sat. 4/26
www.brooklynzinefest.com - facebook.com/brooklynzinefest @BklynZineFest

Morgaine Gooding-Silverwood Speaks at Barnard-Columbia Take Back the Night

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Last night, TALKmag attended the Barnard-Columbia Take Back the Night march, speakout, and rally at Barnard College. Morgaine Gooding-Silverwood delivered the speech this year and, following in our tradition of publishing the TBTN speeches, we’ve reproduced her entire speech for those of you who missed it! What better way to report on the event, we think, than letting those who attended and spoke, to speak for themselves: 

TW: Sexual Assault

First of all, I want to thank the organizers for extending me this honor, and thank you to everyone here, students, administrators, survivors, allies, family and friends. I also want to acknowledge those who couldn’t make it tonight. Your existence is revolutionary. Thank you for refusing to crumble or disappear in the wake of unspeakable trauma.

I can’t begin to explain what it means to be standing here tonight. After all, it was here, three years ago, at the post-march speak-out, where as a first-year I first openly discussed my own sexual assault.

Talking about my attack was terrifying. There was no script, just a microphone, a makeshift wall for anonymity, and my memories—memories that I had avoided revisiting for years out of both fear and guilt. Guilt because I felt that my trauma was invalid, since I had been drunk, flirtatious, and was able to escape my attacker before his nonconsensual groping of my upper body lead any lower.

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Early this morning, Columbia Prison Divest distributed this press release in regard to their “Week of Engagement”
Tuesday, April 15th, 2014
We, Columbia Prison Divest, have organized a number of activities and events on Columbia’s campus during the week of April 14th–18th, titled “People, Prisons & Profit: Where do we fit in?” The purpose of this Week of Engagement is to continue the ongoing campus-wide conversation about what divestment from the private prison industry would look like and why it is important, in a way that is accessible to as many community members as possible. We are also organizing to reiterate our previously voiced demands, including a long-awaited meeting with Columbia University President Lee Bollinger.
We have created this Week of Engagement to demonstrate that members of the Columbia community will not support an industry that profits off of the commodification of human bodies and the destruction of vulnerable, marginalized communities. But our work is not occurring in isolation on Columbia’s campus alone. We are also organizing in solidarity with the actions of divestment campaigns at several campuses across the nation, including the University of Central Florida and schools in the University of California system. We position ourselves within a growing anti-mass incarceration student movement that works to hold ourselves and our schools accountable to investment practices that are just and humane.
Columbia Prison Divest’s Week of Engagement will consist of events, performances, discussions, and interactive activities across campus in collaboration with a number of Columbia student groups, including Students Against Mass Incarceration (SAMI), AlterNATIVE Education, Students for Justice in Palestine (SJP), cIRCa, Radical College Undergraduates Not Tolerating Sexism (Radical C.U.N.T.S.), LUCHA, Columbia Prison Reform & Education Project (PREP), Freedom School, Original Green (O.G.), and Potluck House.
Our schedule consists of the following:

On Monday April 14th, CPD will be tabling and flyering in Lerner and on the sundial, and will also host a teach-in on Education as it pertains to the prison industrial complex at the Malcolm X Lounge from 6-8pm with PREP and AlterNATIVE.
On Tuesday April 15th, CPD will be tabling again, and will also be hosting a film screening from 7-10 pm in 409 Barnard Hall with a discussion facilitated by neuroscientist and Columbia professor Dr. Carl Hart.
On Wednesday April 16th, CPD will be featuring student art, music, and spoken word performances at the sundial with cIRCa, and will also be facilitating a conversation about criminalization from 7-9pm in the Malcolm X Lounge with LUCHA and SAMI.
On Thursday April 17th, CPD will have an interactive display on the Low Steps during the day, and will also host both a teach-in with SJP on Low Steps at 3pm. In the afternoon, we will co-host discussion on sexual violence, punishment, and healing with Radical C.U.N.T.S. from 5-7pm in the Malcolm X Lounge, before participating in and supporting Take Back the Night’s annual march and speak-out.
On Friday April 18th, CPD will close the week on Ancel Plaza (in front of East Campus) from 2-5pm with a speak-out/cypher, and then finally end the week with a kickback co-sponsored by the IRC’s Original Green committee at Potluck House (606 w. 114th St.) at 7pm.


Columbia Prison Divest openly invites any and all members of the community interested in becoming more involved with the campaign to attend any and all of the aforementioned events, and to approach us with your questions, comments, and contributions.

Early this morning, Columbia Prison Divest distributed this press release in regard to their “Week of Engagement”

Tuesday, April 15th, 2014

We, Columbia Prison Divest, have organized a number of activities and events on Columbia’s campus during the week of April 14th–18th, titled “People, Prisons & Profit: Where do we fit in?” The purpose of this Week of Engagement is to continue the ongoing campus-wide conversation about what divestment from the private prison industry would look like and why it is important, in a way that is accessible to as many community members as possible. We are also organizing to reiterate our previously voiced demands, including a long-awaited meeting with Columbia University President Lee Bollinger.

We have created this Week of Engagement to demonstrate that members of the Columbia community will not support an industry that profits off of the commodification of human bodies and the destruction of vulnerable, marginalized communities. But our work is not occurring in isolation on Columbia’s campus alone. We are also organizing in solidarity with the actions of divestment campaigns at several campuses across the nation, including the University of Central Florida and schools in the University of California system. We position ourselves within a growing anti-mass incarceration student movement that works to hold ourselves and our schools accountable to investment practices that are just and humane.

Columbia Prison Divest’s Week of Engagement will consist of events, performances, discussions, and interactive activities across campus in collaboration with a number of Columbia student groups, including Students Against Mass Incarceration (SAMI), AlterNATIVE Education, Students for Justice in Palestine (SJP), cIRCa, Radical College Undergraduates Not Tolerating Sexism (Radical C.U.N.T.S.), LUCHA, Columbia Prison Reform & Education Project (PREP), Freedom School, Original Green (O.G.), and Potluck House.

Our schedule consists of the following:

On Monday April 14th, CPD will be tabling and flyering in Lerner and on the sundial, and will also host a teach-in on Education as it pertains to the prison industrial complex at the Malcolm X Lounge from 6-8pm with PREP and AlterNATIVE.

On Tuesday April 15th, CPD will be tabling again, and will also be hosting a film screening from 7-10 pm in 409 Barnard Hall with a discussion facilitated by neuroscientist and Columbia professor Dr. Carl Hart.

On Wednesday April 16th, CPD will be featuring student art, music, and spoken word performances at the sundial with cIRCa, and will also be facilitating a conversation about criminalization from 7-9pm in the Malcolm X Lounge with LUCHA and SAMI.

On Thursday April 17th, CPD will have an interactive display on the Low Steps during the day, and will also host both a teach-in with SJP on Low Steps at 3pm. In the afternoon, we will co-host discussion on sexual violence, punishment, and healing with Radical C.U.N.T.S. from 5-7pm in the Malcolm X Lounge, before participating in and supporting Take Back the Night’s annual march and speak-out.

On Friday April 18th, CPD will close the week on Ancel Plaza (in front of East Campus) from 2-5pm with a speak-out/cypher, and then finally end the week with a kickback co-sponsored by the IRC’s Original Green committee at Potluck House (606 w. 114th St.) at 7pm.

Columbia Prison Divest openly invites any and all members of the community interested in becoming more involved with the campaign to attend any and all of the aforementioned events, and to approach us with your questions, comments, and contributions.


Take Back the Night

This Thursday, April 14th, Take Back the Night is having their annual march and speak out to end sexual violence and rape culture. The rally starts at 7:45pm right outside of Barnard Hall and will last until 10pm. The guest speaker will be Morgaine Gooding-Silverwood, a Columbia University student and activist.

The Speak Out is after the rally at 10pm in the Event Oval in the Diana Center (LL1). This is a safe space for the students and community to anonymously share their stories. 

For more information, check out the FaceBook event: http://tinyurl.com/TBTN2014

See you all there!!!

photo courtesy of Columbia-Barnard Take Back the Night

Historical Perspectives on Domestic Worker Organizing

Domestic Worker Organizing event

TALKITES!

Add this to your calendars!!! On April 16 the BCRW will host Historical Perspectives on Domestic Worker Organizing, featuring Elizabeth Quay Hutchison and Premilla Nadasen. They will look at the changing labor relations of domestic service over the course of the 20th century.

Check out the event here!

President Bollinger Responds to Prison Divest

President Bollinger responds to Columbia students’ question about Columbia’s investment and complicity in the prison industrial complex, 

On Tuesday, April 1st, 2014, Columbia students pushed the panel and audience at an event held in Low Library to consider the university’s role in ending the legacy of slavery in the United States. The event - Ebony & Ivy: Race, Slavery, and the Troubled History of America’s Universities - was meant to explore “the history of slavery in New York City, the intersections of slavery and Columbia University, and issues of race at Universities in the 20th century”, according to an email sent out to the Columbia community.

After an address by MIT Professor Craig S. Wilder (author of the book which the event was named after) and remarks from Columbia’s own Eric Foner, Ansley T. Erickson, and Karl Jacoby, the event featured an audience question-and-answer session which Columbia student activists took advantage of. Upon informing the panel and audience that Columbia reported having $8 million invested in the nation’s largest private prison company, student activists asked the panel to reflect on the connections between Columbia’s investment in the prison industrial complex now, and their former investment in the institution of American slavery (a recording of this question can be viewed here). Professor Craig S. WIlder responded by saying:

Mass incarceration is one of the critical issues - generational issues - effecting our nation, and I am fully in favor of …divestment from private prison corporations…

After the panel took another audience member’s question, another Columbia student (as seen in the video above) asked Bollinger - who was also in attendance - to respond directly. Professor Foner responded first, invoking the history of the student movements that forced Columbia to divest from companies who did business in South Africa, and stated:

That was the result of a very long and large student movement on this campus…I do think history shows that eventually they will respond to a large scale movement of one kind or another

Foner went on to state that he did not believe “running into the office and presenting the investments is going to win”, but he encouraged students to put more “nonviolent” pressure on the issue.

After Foner’s response, Bollinger - who spoke on his dedication to affirmative action in his opening welcome and introductory remarks for the event - responded directly: 

You really have the opportunity to make your case in this process…I am thrilled that you have raised a number of questions that make people like me feel uncomfortable. These are hard problems. They’re difficult, and you want to come and make your case as strongly as you can, and we’ll try to be as fair and judicious and yet passionate about this as well. 

Be sure to follow TALK Magazine for more updates on Columbia Prison Divest’s activities (and to check out President Bollinger’s charming smile for the camera in the video at 3:48). 

African Women’s Rights and Resilience Symposium

http://bcrw.barnard.edu/blog/african-womens-rights-and-resilience/